Künstlerinnen international, 1877-1977 (“Female Artists International 1877–1977”)

400,00 kr.

Rare catalogue from groundbreaking survey exhibition of female artists

In stock

Description

Bovenschen, Silvia. – Petersen, Karin. – Sarah Schumann. – Lucy R. Lippard. – Hannah Höch. – Meret Oppenheim. – Diane Arbus, Tabea Blumenschein, Louise Bourgeois, Margaret Bourke-White, Gisela Breitling, Judy Chicago, Valie Export, Helen Frankenthaler, Käthe Kollwitz, Jeanne Mammen, Paula Modersohn-Becker, Gabriele Münter, Ketty La Rocca, Ulrike Rosenbach, Martha Rosler, Carolee Schneemann, Katharina Sieverding et al

Berlin: Schloss Charlottenburg, Neue Gesellschaft für Bildende Kunst (NGBK art society) / Arbeitsgruppe Frauen in der Kunst, 1977. 4to in wraps as issued. 370 pages. Illustrated, mainly in black and white. Text in German. Soiled and stained cover and edges. Except last pages, inside clean. One page loose, else book is solid and overall acceptable / good as reading or reference copy.

The women who put together the show Künstlerinnen International 1877–1977 (Female Artists International 1877–1977) were Ursula Bierther, Evelyn Kuwertz, Karin Petersen, Inge Schumacher, Ulrike Stelzl, Petra Zöfelt, Silvia Bovenschen und Sarah Schumann. It was among the first exhibitions of its kind in Europe of women artists (preceeded by Kvindeudstillingen in Copenhagen 1975). The show was quickly met with a hostile reception before being just as quickly forgotten – even in the annals of feminist art history, at least until very recently. One faction within the group campaigned for the works shown to be realistic psychological portrayals: what women dream about, how they suffer from being women, women as victims, how they liberate themselves from this, etc. For others who were working to support art by women in a general sense, this was pure kitsch. There were hard-fought debates, which sometimes caused divisions within the group. Those who believed in the existence of ‘women’s art’ wanted to establish a consistently ‘feminine aesthetic’; the others opposed that. They said: let’s start by showing everything that exists. The exhibition was huge, with some very valuable exhibits. Art of all different kinds – but no housewife art. Valie Export, Ulrike Rosenbach and many others did performances during the show. The tenor of public opinion was that it made no sense just to show women because they are women. That’s a legitimate concern. But the outrage came from two very different sides. The fundamentalist feminists said: this is just the same old art shit again and all women are artists! They stormed the show and hung up tampons and were outraged that we had actually made choices, a selection. From the other side came scorn and derision along the lines of: what’s all this women’s stuff? There was no respect, not even for artists who had a place in art history or the contemporary art scene. The fact that women dared to organize an exhibition of this scale and scope in this venerable palace was seen as impudent, the cheek of it! Looking back, it’s hard to understand. Later, when similar exhibitions were staged on a much smaller scale, this show was never mentioned – it’s been more or less forgotten, although it would now be totally impossible to bring the same exhibits together in this way again

Künstlerinnen international, 1877-1977 ("Female Artists International 1877–1977")

400,00 kr.

In stock